Travel and Maps

TRVEA Logo These maps cover the City, County, State, and Federal parkland trails in the magnificent Tijuana River Valley region–including Border Field State Park on the beach, and Monument Mesa where the great countries of the United States and Mexico meet at the Pacific Ocean.

Some maps are large file sizes and might take several minutes to open. Most maps are pdf, MS or ppt formats.

See the Trails Current Info page (under Categories) for local trail conditions and cautions.

 

IMPORTANT DETOUR: Effie May Crossing Closed., Click here for one possible alternate route (depending on amount of current rain) ->  Beach Route Detour Until After Sept 2014 Also, see the Trails Current Info (under Categories located on the home page).

 

NEWEST as of March 29 2010: TRV Trail Map March 2010

Tijuana River Valley Satellite Map

 

AREA MAPS AND STAGING

TRVEA TRAIL ROUTES shows trails and loops to ride, graded from Easy to Difficult.

Tijuana River Valley Park Agency Jurisdictional Map

Tijuana River Valley Park Agency Jurisdictional Map – Aerial

Hollister Street Staging Map

Monument Rd. Border Field State Park Gate Staging Map

Border Field State Park Monument Mesa Staging Map

 

ARCHIVE MAPS AND GUIDES

Tijuana River Valley Trail Map East of Hollister Magnified – Old

Tijuana River Valley Trail Map West of Hollister Magnified – Old

Tijuana River Valley Trail Map Full View – Old

TRV – State and Federal Parkland – Old

Although there are not overnight public facilities in the valley, you can make arrangements with one of the many private equestrian ranches located in the valley to stable your horse and to park your fully contained campers. For example, for horse stabling and dry camping, contact D & J Ranch, located on the NW corner of Hollister Ave and Monument Road; 619-428-2214. (Call about tents.)

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IMPORTANT: Always ride only on trails that clearly are trails. The entire valley is a complicated network of protection for endangered birds, biological mitigation, and flood plain. If there are clearly many hoof prints on a trail, it’s probably okay to ride that trail. Do not breach fences or ride through areas that appear unused by other riders–the area is probably protected. These protected areas ensure a viable and diverse wildlife experience for all of us into the future. There are quicksandsmud bogs, and deep drop-offs on natural looking ground or hidden by brush, and alongside trails. This is not an idle warning–be positive about the ground if you decide to step off the trail system.

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Spooners Mesa, Goat Canyon, circa January 2005; Tijuana in the background. (Enlarge the photos by clicking on them.)Spooners Mesa circa January 2005 Spooners Mesa (left), Goat Canyon (right); Tijuana in Background circa January 2005

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Looking West from Amsod Farm to Pacific OceanLooking west towards the Pacific Ocean; Spooners Mesa (upper left); circa January 2005. There are over 4 miles of  equestrian and hiking trails under forest canopy (center-right); and there is a total designated trail system of over 33 miles. (Enlarge the photos by clicking on them.)

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Tijuana River Estuary at the Pacific OceanAerial view of the Tijuana River Estuary with the Pacific Ocean. ; circa January 2005. The City of Imperial Beach and the Imperial Beach Pier are seen upper center-right of the photograph. The heavy rains of January 2005 swelled the TRV estuary, substantially widening it with fast and deep water. Typically, at lowest tides, the estuary can be shallow. However, with even small rains and storms, and for high tides, the estuary is deep and fast and dangerous to enter.